RESEARCH ARTICLE


Predicting Truck At-Fault Crashes Using Crash and Traffic Offence Data



Mahdi Rezapour1, Shaun S. Wulff2, Khaled Ksaibati1, *
1 Department of Civil & Architectural Engineering University of Wyoming Office: EN 3084 1000 E University Ave, Dept. 3295 Laramie, WY 82071, USA
2 Department of Statistics University of Wyoming Office: Ross Hall 336, USA


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© 2018 Rezapour et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Civil & Architectural Engineering University of Wyoming Office: EN 3084 1000 E University Ave, Dept. 3295 Laramie, WY 82071, USA, Tel: 307.766.6230; E-mail: Khaled@uwyo.edu


Abstract

Introduction:

The number of truck-related injuries and deaths can be reduced by understanding the factors that contribute to the higher risk of truck-related crashes and violations. Truck drivers are at fault of more than 80% of all the truck crashes on Wyoming interstates, and the literature review indicated that in order to identify appropriate countermeasure to crashes, each crash type should be analyzed individually. The literature review also revealed that relationships exist between driving records and driver culpability in crashes.

Method:

This study employed two approaches to identify contributory factors to truck-at-fault fatal and injury crashes, and truck-related violations. Interstate 80, a Wyoming corridor in a mountainous area with one of the highest truck crash rates in the US, was selected as a case study. Only truck-at-fault crashes and specific types of truck-related violations were considered in this study. The analyses include two approaches. First, the logistic regression model was employed to explore vehicle, driver, crash, and environmental characteristics that contribute to truck-at-fault fatal and injury crashes. Second, truck violations were used as a proxy for truck crashes to examine the tendency to violate truck-related traffic laws in relation to driver and temporal characteristics. Based on the literature, only violations associated with higher risk of severe crashes were included in the analyses. The included violations accounted for more than 70% of all the violations.

Result:

This study considered more than 30 variables and found that only 10 variables impact truck-at-fault crashes. These factors included: gender, history of past violation, crashes involving multiple vehicles, exceeding the speed limit, occupant distraction, driver ejection, fatigued driving, non-seat belt usage, overturn, and head-on collision. Results of the second analysis indicated that both residency and time of crash are factors that impact truck-related violations. Results of the analysis also indicated that both residency and time of the crash are factors that impact truck-related violations.

Keywords: Truck-at-fault crash, Severe crashes, Injury, Fatality, Logistic regression, Enforcement, Citation, Risky violation.